Mesmerizing Views | NW Portland

Posted on July 30, 2018 at 10:25 pm
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SW Portland Modern | $1,795,000

Posted on July 30, 2018 at 10:09 pm
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The Pros and Cons of Metal Roofing

If the time has come to get a new roof for your home, you might like to consider the option of metal roofing. This important improvement project is something most long-time homeowners will eventually have to undertake, and choosing the proper roofing material should not be taken lightly. A functioning roof will protect your home from harsh outdoor elements like rain and snow and ensure its structural integrity.

Asphalt shingles are common, but the one type of covering that is catching the eye of an increasing number of homeowners is metal roofing. “Metal roofing is gaining in popularity,” reports Todd Miller, president of Isaiah Industries in Piqua, OH. It had a 14% market share in 2016, up from 11% the year before, according to FW Dodge. Only asphalt shingles outpace metal in the remodeling market.

 In terms of style and utility, metal roofing gives any other material a run for its money, but does it suit your home (and budget)? Take a look at the best and worst things about metal roofing before you commit to it.

Pro: Metal roofing lasts 50 years—or longer

Metal roofs are by far one of the most durable, typically lasting 50 years or more, says Andrew Hecox, owner of Air Capital Roofing and Remodeling in Wichita, KS.

“Rubber and asphalt shingles are fine for 15 to 20 years, but they’ll deteriorate over time, due to weather, wind, heat, insects, and rodents,” says Cedric Stewart, a real estate agent with Keller Williams Capital Properties in Washington, DC. And metal won’t corrode, crack, or catch sparks and ignite into flames from a lightning strike.

“Metal roofing also doesn’t need periodic costly maintenance, like other materials,” says Lonnie Hagen of Accent Roofing and Construction in Dallas.

Con: It’s noisy

The pitter-patter of raindrops may be soothing for some homeowners, but on a metal roof, the noise factor can be a serious drawback. The good news is that there are ways to mitigate the sound—but you’ll have to pony up. Materials can be installed to reduce the drumming effect for an additional fee.

Con: Metal costs more

“Metal roofs can cost three times more than other materials,” says Hagen. According to HomeAdvisor, the average cost of installing asphalt shingles is $3,700, while metal roofing costs around $7,795 to install.

Pro: It’s rather stylish

Not every metal roof has to be boring brown or ho-hum gray. In fact, you have nearly the entire rainbow to choose from. You can also order metal roofing to look like wood shakes, slate, tile, or standard fiberglass shingles, says Miller. “This allows owners to match their home’s architectural style,” he notes.

Con: Extreme weather can damage metal

If you live in a place with extreme weather, you should know that metal roofs are hail-resistant—but a violent storm can still dent them, says Hecox. Your roof will protect your home, but insurance companies may not compensate you for the repair of cosmetic damage, he adds. Aluminum or copper, while stylish, are soft metals that are more likely to experience denting.

Pro: Metal can save energy … and the environment

Who doesn’t want to save on heating and cooling costs? “This type of roof reflects solar radiant heat, which can reduce cooling costs by up to 30%,” says Hagen.

And if you’re thinking of installing solar panels, having a metal roof is recommended, says Reba Haas, a real estate agent in Seattle. “Metal is the best material to have underneath panels, because it’s lighter than asphalt construction,” Haas says.

Green builders or eco-friendly homeowners will be happy to know that metal roofs contain anywhere from 25% to 95% of recycled materials and are also 100% recyclable, Hagen says.

Con: It might not fit in

You love the look, but your neighbors … not so much. There are newer home subdivisions and homeowners’ associations (HOA) that don’t allow this type of roof in their communities, so check your HOA’s bylines before you start the project.

Pro: Metal roofing is easy to install

Don’t be alarmed if your contractor does a happy dance when you say you’ve chosen metal roofing. “[It’s] lightweight and comes in panels, which can be cut to exact dimensions—all of which make installation easier than other materials,” says Hecox. And you can sometimes place metal over existing shingles, which cuts down on the costs in time and labor of removing the old roofing, he adds. Metal is also easier to install on a steep pitched roof, again, because the panels are larger than individual shingles, says Haas. That versatility makes it ideal for houses of all shapes and sizes.

Posted on July 16, 2018 at 11:10 pm
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Bridlemile Newer Construction | $1,375,000

Posted on July 10, 2018 at 12:08 am
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4119 SW Tualatin

Posted on July 3, 2018 at 10:56 pm
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2622 SW Talbot Road | $1,700,000

Posted on June 27, 2018 at 10:22 pm
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New Listing at the Elizabeth Condominiums


Posted on June 6, 2018 at 11:43 pm
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4047 SW 58th | A Vibrant Place to Live

Posted on May 8, 2018 at 11:44 pm
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4047 SW 58th

Posted on April 9, 2018 at 10:18 pm
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6 Tax Myths Even Smart Homeowners Believe are True

| Mar 19, 2018 | realtor.com

With all the mayhem and misconceptions flying around, we’re here to set the record straight, by highlighting the top tax myths that might dupe even the financial Einsteins among us—both for this filing year (which is still under the old IRS rules) and next, once the new tax code takes effect.

So whether you want to enter this filing season with clear-eyed confidence or just test what you know, check out this list and ask yourself honestly: How many of these fake tax facts did you believe were true?

Tax myth 1: The mortgage interest deduction is gone

On the contrary: If you bought your home before Dec. 15, 2017, you’re in luck: You are grandfathered in under the old tax laws and can still deduct all of the interest on loans of up to $1 million, says Tom Wheelwright, CPA and CEO of WealthAbility.com. Yes, even when the new tax codes go into effect next year.

And for those who bought a home after Dec. 15, 2017, or plan to in the future, it’s not as bleak as many think. Starting next year, mortgage interest is still deductible; it’s just that the deductible amount is capped at $750,000.

Tax myth 2: Property tax deductions are gone, too

In the past (and for the last time this year), most taxpayers could deduct state, city, and property taxes in their entirety. Under the new tax plan next year, these taxes are still deductible, but there’s a cap—of $10,000 per year, says Mario Costanz of Happy Tax.

In other words, property tax and mortgage interest deductions are far from gone … but one thing to consider is that next year, the standard deduction nearly doubles—to $12,000 for single filers and $24,000 when filing as married. As such, it may not make sense for as many people to itemize their deductions unless it amounts to more than this high new bar. Here’s more info on how to tell whether you should take the itemized vs. standard deduction.

Tax myth 3: If you work at home, you can deduct a home office

Some people mistakenly think that anyone who fires up a laptop at the kitchen island has a “home office.” But to take a home office deduction, that area must not only be used regularly and exclusively for business, it has to be the primary site of the business. So if you turned a spare room into a dedicated work space, you can claim it. But if you occasionally work in the living room, that’s not deductible, says Josh Zimmelman, owner of Westwood Tax & Consulting, a New York-based accounting firm with offices in Manhattan and Long Island.

Plus, things get even stricter under the new tax codes.

In the past, office employees who occasionally worked from home could claim eligible home office deductions that might include, say, business expenses that were not reimbursed by your employer (here’s more about how to take a home office tax deduction this year). But starting in 2018, only self-employed people can deduct their home office in any way. So if you own your own business, you’re fine; if you’re paid by W-2, you can kiss this deduction goodbye when you file next year.

Tax myth 4: You can deduct all of your home renovations

Sorry, DIYers: Home improvements are generally not tax deductible unless the residence also serves as a rental property. But there are a few exceptions where homeowners can cash in.

The first is if modifications were made for medical purposes that don’t increase your property value, which might include installing railings or support bars, building ramps, widening doorways, lowering cabinets or electrical fixtures, and adding stair lifts. Note: You’ll need a letter from your doctor to prove the modifications are medically necessary to claim these deductions. Plus, those expenses must exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income in 2017, which drops to 7.5% in 2018.

The other time you can deduct renovations is if they were made in order to sell your home.  You can deduct those expenses as selling costs, as long as the home improvements were made within 90 days of closing.

Tax myth 5: All home equity interest is deductible

Homeowners can turn to a home equity loan or line of credit (HELOC) for cash to either make home improvements or for more general expenses, like paying for a child’s college tuition or wedding. And in past years, the interest on these loans was tax-deductible.

Not so for next year: While the IRS has not yet issued any formal guidance, it appears that with the new tax law, HELOC interest is only deductible if the loan is used for a “substantial home improvement,” says Professor David Reiss of Brooklyn College. Also keep in mind that next year, your total deductible mortgage and eligible home equity debt must be less than the $750,000 cap.

Tax myth 6: You can always deduct your moving expenses

Up until this year, taxpayers could only deduct a portion of moving expenses when they relocated for a new job that’s at least 50 miles farther from their former home than their old job location. And per the new 2018 tax bill, no moving expenses of any kind are deductible. The only exceptions are for members of the armed forces on active duty.

Posted on March 20, 2018 at 11:29 pm
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