Bridlemile Newer Construction | $1,375,000

Posted on August 7, 2018 at 8:11 pm
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1961 SW Vista Avenue | $1,895,000

The house designed by the firm of Foulkes and Hogue in 1913 for Dr. Ami Nichols is a prime example of Colonial Revival architecture in Portland. Well maintained at 1961 SW Vista Avenue, the Nichols House is an anchor for the other excellent Colonial Revival houses in its immediate neighborhood. In most aspects, the plan and façade are symmetrical. There is a hipped central roof and a kitchen wing to the rear. A large portico with balcony faces east toward the city, and it is supported by four Ionic columns, a design repeated in the corner pilasters. The house’s fine cornice is supported by modillions, and the entablature is dignified by egg-and-dart molding, all accomplished with unparalleled craftsmanship. The details extend to the recessed entrance porch and balcony above. At the entrance level, concave niches with a shell motif at the top align on either side of the entrance door. The main floor windows are unusual, with 1/1 panes and a transom light above. Quality of detailing is also found in the interior, where Ionic column theme is repeated in the large entrance hall. Further Colonial Revival characteristics are seen in the main stair, the built-in dining room buffet, and the fireplaces.

Classic Homes of Portland, Oregon 1850-1950, William J. Hawkins, III, and William F. Willingham

Posted on August 6, 2018 at 11:34 pm
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2731 SW Greenway Avenue | $935,000

This functional residence exudes unpretentious charm and a relaxed but refined lifestyle. The home features fresh paint colors, wood floors, an eat-in kitchen, extensive moldings and high ceilings. The custom craftsmanship makes this a wonderful combination of light interiors and facilitates a wide range of entertaining styles. Enjoy a lovely courtyard and expansive decks. Ideally located close to OHSU, NW 23rd, city & high tech.

Posted on July 25, 2018 at 8:16 pm
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4119 SW Tualatin

Posted on July 3, 2018 at 10:56 pm
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Exquisite Redone Estate | 4119 SW Tualatin

Posted on June 6, 2018 at 12:01 am
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Westerlook Farm | 46 Acres in Carlton, Oregon

Posted on April 27, 2018 at 5:32 pm
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Love that Home’s View? See How Much You’ll Pay

April 4, 2018
 Love that home’s view? See how much more you’ll payA house with a fabulous view can be hard for a home buyer to resist. But seeing the mountains, water or city lights from the comfort of home comes at a price. The hazy part is figuring out what that added cost is — and whether it’s worth it.

That’s where real estate appraisers and analysts who study home values can help, even though they recognize there’s no simple answer.

“Views are actually really difficult to quantify,” says Andy Krause, principal data scientist at Greenfield Advisors, a real estate research company. “It’s somewhat subjective. What makes a better water view? Do you want it to be wider? Do you want more of the water from a taller angle? You know, some of that is in the eye of the beholder.”

Assigning a dollar value can also be difficult because not all views are equal or valuable, and a view that’s sought-after in one location may not be in another.

In Manhattan, a place that overlooks a green space or woods will cost you a lot extra. In the countryside? Not as much, says Mauricio Rodriguez, a real estate expert who chairs the finance department at Texas Christian University’s Neeley School of Business.

Putting a price on it

So how do you put a price on a variety of views? Krause, who builds automated valuation models that analyze home data, produced these estimates for what five different types of views might add to a home’s price in Seattle:

  • 5 to 10%: For a home on flat ground with an unobstructed view of an open space or a park, a seller could add 5 to 10%. In other words, if an identical home without a view is worth $500,000 elsewhere in Seattle, this view could boost the price to $525,000 to $550,000.
  • 10 to 30%: A home partway up a hill with a partially obstructed water view over neighbors’ rooftops could increase the overall price by 10 to 30%. It depends on how much of your field of vision the view fills, both vertically and horizontally, Krause says. In this example, a home otherwise worth $500,000 might fetch $550,000 to $650,000.
  • 30 to 50%: This time Krause considered the same home as above, in the same location, but with an unobstructed view. “You still have the neighbors above looking down into your house, but you have a nice water view,” he says. With this clearer view, the $500,000 home could sell for $650,000 to $750,000.
  • 50 to 75%: Next, envision a home atop a hill with an unobstructed cityscape or open-space vista. To buy the $500,000 home in this location, a buyer might have to pay $725,000 to $875,000.
  • 75-100% or more: Finally, imagine a house with a stunning, unobstructed view of a big lake or the ocean. This type of prized view can boost the value of a home worth $500,000 in an ordinary location to $1 million or more, Krause says.\

How to shop for a home with a view

If having a view is a must on your homebuying list, here are a couple of tips from the experts:

1. FIND OUT IF THE VIEW IS PROTECTED

Frank Lucco, a residential real estate appraiser and consultant in Houston, once had clients with an expensive home who sued after a high-rise office tower went up across the street. The building disrupted their view and gave office workers a view of their formerly private backyard and their teenage daughters using the pool. The lawsuit was dismissed, Lucco says, and a bit of detective work could have told them that commercial development was allowed.

To avoid a similar outcome, Lucco says before you place a bid on a home, ask planning authorities what the zoning allows and if high-impact developments are planned nearby.

2. LOOK FOR DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH

Bargain-hunters can occasionally find views for cheap because poor design — walls where a big window or a deck might go, for instance — blocks what should be a nice view.

“It may cost you $15,000 to $30,000 to do a very limited remodel that gives you a better angle, or higher vantage point, or a rooftop deck,” Krause says. But that could be a deal compared with buying a home that already takes full advantage of its view. Lucco suggests inspecting the home’s deed for any restrictions limiting additions to the height. Pay careful attention to homeowner association rules, too.

A view can be one of the most attractive aspects of a home. Knowing that you paid the right price for it can make the scenery that much more enjoyable.

This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published by The Associated Press. 

Posted on April 11, 2018 at 9:49 pm
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2929 NW Cumberland Road | Spectacular Views

Posted on March 30, 2018 at 8:19 am
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2970 NW Circle A

Posted on December 12, 2017 at 11:54 pm
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Modern Portland Estate | SW Thomas

Posted on November 16, 2017 at 12:37 am
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